GENERAL DENTISTRY

DENTAL EXAMS & CLEANINGS

Dental Exam

A comprehensive dental exam will be performed by your dentist at your initial dental visit.  At regular check-up exams, your dentist and hygienist will perform the following:

  • Examination of diagnostic X-rays (radiographs): Essential for detection of decay, tumors, cysts, and bone loss.  X-rays also help determine tooth and root positions.
  • Oral cancer screening: Check the face, neck, lips, tongue, throat, tissues, and gums for any signs of oral cancer.
  • Gum disease evaluation: Check the gums and bone around the teeth for any signs of periodontal disease.
  • Examination of tooth decay: All tooth surfaces will be checked for decay with special dental instruments.
  • Examination of existing restorations: Check current fillings, crowns, etc.

Professional Dental Cleaning

Professional dental cleanings (dental prophylaxis) are usually performed by Registered Dental Hygienists.  Your cleaning appointment will include a dental exam and the following:

  • Removal of calculus (tartar): Calculus is hardened plaque that has been left on the tooth for some time and is now firmly attached to the tooth surface.  Calculus forms above and below the gum line and can only be removed with special dental instruments.
  • Removal of plaque: Plaque is a sticky, almost invisible film that forms on the teeth.  It is a growing colony of living bacteria, food debris, and saliva.  The bacteria produce toxins (poisons) that inflame the gums.  This inflammation is the start of periodontal disease!
  • Teeth polishing: Remove stain and plaque that is not otherwise removed during tooth brushing and scaling.
    COMPOSITE FILLINGS

    A composite (tooth colored) filling is used to repair a tooth that is affected by decay, cracks, fractures, etc.  The decayed or affected portion of the tooth will be removed and then filled with a composite filling.

    There are many types of filling materials available, each with their own advantages and disadvantages.  You and your dentist can discuss the best options for restoring your teeth.  Composite fillings, along with silver amalgam fillings, are the most widely used today.  Because composite fillings are tooth colored, they can be closely matched to the color of existing teeth, and are more aesthetically suited for use in front teeth or more visible areas of the mouth.

    As with most dental restorations, composite fillings are not permanent and may someday have to be replaced.  They are very durable and will last many years, giving you a long lasting, beautiful smile.

    Reasons for composite fillings:

    • Chipped teeth.
    • Closing space between two teeth.
    • Cracked or broken teeth.
    • Decayed teeth.
    • Worn teeth.

    How are composite fillings placed?

    Composite fillings are usually placed in one appointment.  While the tooth is numb, your dentist will remove decay as needed.  The space will then be thoroughly cleaned and carefully prepared before the new filling is placed.  If the decay was near the nerve of the tooth, a special medication will be applied for added protection.  The composite filling will then be precisely placed, shaped, and polished, restoring your tooth to its original shape and function.

    It is normal to experience sensitivity to hot and cold when composite fillings are first placed, however this will subside shortly after your tooth acclimates to the new filling.

    You will be given care instructions at the conclusion of your treatment.  Good oral hygiene practices, eating habits, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new fillings.

    ROOT CANAL THERAPY

    Root canal therapy is needed when the nerve of a tooth is affected by decay or infection.  In order to save the tooth, the pulp (the living tissue inside the tooth), nerves, bacteria, and any decay are removed and the resulting space is filled with special, medicated, dental materials, which restore the tooth to its full function.

    Having a root canal done on a tooth is the treatment of choice to save a tooth that otherwise would die and have to be removed.  Many patients believe that removing a tooth that has problems is the solution, but what is not realized is that extracting (pulling) a tooth will ultimately be more costly and cause significant problems for adjacent teeth.

    Root canal treatment is highly successful and usually lasts a lifetime, although on occasion, a tooth will have to be retreated due to new infections.

    Signs and symptoms for possible root canal therapy:

    • An abscess (or pimple) on the gums.
    • Sensitivity to hot and cold.
    • Severe toothache pain.
    • Sometimes no symptoms are present.
    • Swelling and/or tenderness.

    Reasons for root canal therapy:

    • Decay has reached the tooth pulp (the living tissue inside the tooth).
    • Infection or abscess have developed inside the tooth or at the root tip.
    • Injury or trauma to the tooth.

    What does root canal therapy involve?

    A root canal procedure requires one or more appointments and can be performed by a dentist or endodontist (a root canal specialist).

    While the tooth is numb, a rubber dam (a sheet of rubber) will be placed around the tooth to keep it dry and free of saliva.  An access opening is made on top of the tooth and a series of root canal files are placed into the opening, one at a time, removing the pulp, nerve tissue, and bacteria.  If tooth decay is present, it will also be removed with special dental instruments.

    Once the tooth is thoroughly cleaned, it will be sealed with either a permanent filling or, if additional appointments are needed, a temporary filling will be placed.

    At the next appointment, usually a week later, the roots and the inside cavity of the tooth will be filled and sealed with special dental materials.  A filling will be placed to cover the opening on top of the tooth.  In addition, all teeth that have root canal treatment should have a crown (cap) placed.  This will protect the tooth and prevent it from breaking, and restore it to its full function.

    After treatment, your tooth may still be sensitive, but this will subside as the inflammation diminishes and the tooth has healed.

    You will be given care instructions after each appointment.  Good oral hygiene practices and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your root canal treatment.

    TOOTH EXTRACTIONS

    Tooth extractions, or the removal of one or more teeth, are usually used as a last resort in dentistry, as keeping the natural tooth in the mouth is ideal. There are many reasons why single or multiple extractions may be performed, including pervasive tooth decay, the impaction of wisdom teeth, or the need to create space for orthodontic devices.

    The most significant short-term benefit associated with tooth extraction is the elimination of pain. If a tooth is severely decayed or an infection is present, removing the affected tooth almost immediately alleviates discomfort. However, it should be noted that further procedures are necessary to replace the extracted tooth. Leaving a gap is not a viable option as the other teeth tend to twist out of alignment to fill the space.

    Why might I need to have a tooth extraction?

    Tooth extractions are incredibly common procedures. It should be reiterated that an extraction is used as a procedure of last resort, when nothing more can be done to save the tooth.

    Here is a brief overview of some of the main reasons for tooth extraction:

    Deep decay – This is easily the most common reason for tooth extraction, accounting for around two-thirds of all extraction procedures performed. When decay affects the surface of the tooth as well as the pulp, root canal procedures cannot be performed. Root canal therapy is only viable where the general structure of the tooth is in stable condition.

    Extra teeth –There are a variety of explanations associated with extra teeth, but most commonly they are baby teeth that do not shed. Extra teeth take up space on the arch, causing nearby teeth to twist out of place. A tooth extraction is necessary in this case to provide enough space for the teeth to properly realign.

    Periodontal disease – Often teeth have to be extracted because the gums and underlying bone are so severely eroded that they can no longer hold the tooth in place securely. The cause of bone and gum recession is almost always advanced periodontal disease (gum disease). Poor bone density means that the chance of restoring the natural tooth is minimal.

    Prior to braces – Traditional orthodontic braces require enough space to for the teeth to move into ideal alignment. If space cannot be created naturally, a tooth may be extracted as an alternative.

    Fractured teeth – Fortunately, dentists are able to save injured teeth in most circumstances with the aid of root canal therapy. However, there are some instances where the tooth has become fractured in a way that makes repair impossible. Your oral health professional will remove the tooth and use a prosthetic replacement in most cases.

    How is the extraction procedure performed?

    Generally, tooth extraction can be simple in nature or involve more complex surgical processes. Simple extractions are performed on fully emerged teeth after applying local anesthetic to the treatment site. Instruments are used to elevate the tooth and then sever the periodontal ligament. The tooth is then carefully removed with dental forceps.

    Surgical extractions are performed on teeth that are either invisible or inaccessible, like un-erupted wisdom teeth. An incision is usually made in the gum tissue and a drill is used to precisely remove some of the adjacent bone tissue. Sometimes, the tooth has to be split into several pieces to completely remove it.

    If you have any questions or concerns about tooth extraction, please contact your oral health care provider.

    CROWNS (CAPS)

    A crown (or cap) is a covering that encases the entire tooth surface, restoring it to its original shape and size.  A crown protects and strengthens tooth structure that cannot be restored with fillings or other types of restorations.

    Although there are several types of crowns, porcelain (tooth colored crown) are the most popular.  They are highly durable and will last many years, but like most dental restorations, they may eventually need to be replaced.  Porcelain crowns are made to match the shape, size, and color of your teeth, giving you a long-lasting, beautiful smile.

    Reasons for crowns:

    • Broken or fractured teeth.
    • Cosmetic enhancement.
    • Decayed teeth.
    • Fractured fillings.
    • Large fillings.
    • Tooth has a root canal.

    What does getting a crown involve?

    A crown procedure usually requires two appointments.  Your first appointment will include taking several highly accurate molds (or impressions) that will be used to create your custom crown.  A mold will also be used to create a temporary crown which will stay on your tooth for approximately two weeks until your new crown is fabricated by a dental laboratory.

    While the tooth is numb, the dentist will prepare the tooth by removing any decay and shaping the surface to properly fit the crown.  Once these details are accomplished, your temporary crown will be placed with temporary cement and your bite will be checked to ensure you are biting properly.

    At your second appointment, your temporary crown will be removed, the tooth will be cleaned, and your new crown will be carefully placed to ensure the spacing and bite are accurate.

    You will be given care instructions and encouraged to have regular dental visits to check your new crown.

    PREVENTATIVE DENTISTRY & CLEANING

    DENTAL EXAMS & CLEANINGS

    Dental Exam

    A comprehensive dental exam will be performed by your dentist at your initial dental visit.  At regular check-up exams, your dentist and hygienist will perform the following:

    • Examination of diagnostic X-rays (radiographs): Essential for detection of decay, tumors, cysts, and bone loss.  X-rays also help determine tooth and root positions.
    • Oral cancer screening: Check the face, neck, lips, tongue, throat, tissues, and gums for any signs of oral cancer.
    • Gum disease evaluation: Check the gums and bone around the teeth for any signs of periodontal disease.
    • Examination of tooth decay: All tooth surfaces will be checked for decay with special dental instruments.
    • Examination of existing restorations: Check current fillings, crowns, etc.

    Professional Dental Cleaning

    Professional dental cleanings (dental prophylaxis) are usually performed by Registered Dental Hygienists.  Your cleaning appointment will include a dental exam and the following:

    • Removal of calculus (tartar): Calculus is hardened plaque that has been left on the tooth for some time and is now firmly attached to the tooth surface.  Calculus forms above and below the gum line and can only be removed with special dental instruments.
    • Removal of plaque: Plaque is a sticky, almost invisible film that forms on the teeth.  It is a growing colony of living bacteria, food debris, and saliva.  The bacteria produce toxins (poisons) that inflame the gums.  This inflammation is the start of periodontal disease!
    • Teeth polishing: Remove stain and plaque that is not otherwise removed during tooth brushing and scaling.
      FLOURIDE TREATMENT

      Fluoride is the most effective agent available to help prevent tooth decay.  It is a mineral that is naturally present in varying amounts in almost all foods and water supplies.  The benefits of fluoride have been well known for over 50 years and are supported by many health and professional organizations.

      Fluoride works in two ways:

      Topical fluoride strengthens the teeth once they have erupted by seeping into the outer surface of the tooth enamel, making the teeth more resistant to decay.  We gain topical fluoride by using fluoride containing dental products such as toothpaste, mouth rinses, and gels.  Dentists and dental hygienists generally recommend that children have a professional application of fluoride twice a year during dental check-ups.

      Systemic fluoride strengthens the teeth that have erupted as well as those that are developing under the gums.  We gain systemic fluoride from most foods and our community water supplies.  It is also available as a supplement in drop or gel form and can be prescribed by your dentist or physician.  Generally, fluoride drops are recommended for infants, and tablets are best suited for children up through the teen years.  It is very important to monitor the amounts of fluoride a child ingests.  If too much fluoride is consumed while the teeth are developing, a condition called fluorosis (white spots on the teeth) may result.

      Although most people receive fluoride from food and water, sometimes it is not enough to help prevent decay.  Your dentist or dental hygienist may recommend the use of home and/or professional fluoride treatments for the following reasons:

      • Deep pits and fissures on the chewing surfaces of teeth.
      • Exposed and sensitive root surfaces.
      • Fair to poor oral hygiene habits.
      • Frequent sugar and carbohydrate intake.
      • Inadequate exposure to fluorides.
      • Inadequate saliva flow due to medical conditions, medical treatments or medications.
      • Recent history of dental decay.

      Remember, fluoride alone will not prevent tooth decay!  It is important to brush at least twice a day, floss regularly, eat balanced meals, reduce sugary snacks, and visit your dentist on a regular basis.

      SEALANTS

      A sealant is a thin, plastic coating applied to the chewing surface of molars, premolars and any deep grooves (called pits and fissures) of teeth.  More than 75% of dental decay begins in these deep grooves.  Teeth with these conditions are hard to clean and are very susceptible to decay.  A sealant protects the tooth by sealing deep grooves, creating a smooth, easy to clean surface.

      Sealants can protect teeth from decay for many years, but need to be checked for wear and chipping at regular dental visits.

      Reasons for sealants:

      • Children and teenagers – As soon as the six-year molars (the first permanent back teeth) appear or any time throughout the cavity prone years of 6-16.
      • Adults – Tooth surfaces without decay that have deep grooves or depressions.
      • Baby teeth – Occasionally done if teeth have deep grooves or depressions and child is cavity prone.

      What do sealants involve?

      Sealants are easily applied by your dentist or dental hygienist and the process takes only a couple of minutes per tooth.

      The teeth to be sealed are thoroughly cleaned and then surrounded with cotton to keep the area dry.  A special solution is applied to the enamel surface to help the sealant bond to the teeth.  The teeth are then rinsed and dried.  Sealant material is carefully painted onto the enamel surface to cover the deep grooves or depressions.  Depending on the type of sealant used, the material will either harden automatically or with a special curing light.

      Proper home care, a balanced diet, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new sealants.

        CHILDREN DENTISTRY

        DENTAL EXAMS & CLEANINGS

        Dental Exam

        A comprehensive dental exam will be performed by your dentist at your initial dental visit.  At regular check-up exams, your dentist and hygienist will perform the following:

        • Examination of diagnostic X-rays (radiographs): Essential for detection of decay, tumors, cysts, and bone loss.  X-rays also help determine tooth and root positions.
        • Oral cancer screening: Check the face, neck, lips, tongue, throat, tissues, and gums for any signs of oral cancer.
        • Gum disease evaluation: Check the gums and bone around the teeth for any signs of periodontal disease.
        • Examination of tooth decay: All tooth surfaces will be checked for decay with special dental instruments.
        • Examination of existing restorations: Check current fillings, crowns, etc.

        Professional Dental Cleaning

        Professional dental cleanings (dental prophylaxis) are usually performed by Registered Dental Hygienists.  Your cleaning appointment will include a dental exam and the following:

        • Removal of calculus (tartar): Calculus is hardened plaque that has been left on the tooth for some time and is now firmly attached to the tooth surface.  Calculus forms above and below the gum line and can only be removed with special dental instruments.
        • Removal of plaque: Plaque is a sticky, almost invisible film that forms on the teeth.  It is a growing colony of living bacteria, food debris, and saliva.  The bacteria produce toxins (poisons) that inflame the gums.  This inflammation is the start of periodontal disease!
        • Teeth polishing: Remove stain and plaque that is not otherwise removed during tooth brushing and scaling.
          SEALANTS

          A sealant is a thin, plastic coating applied to the chewing surface of molars, premolars and any deep grooves (called pits and fissures) of teeth.  More than 75% of dental decay begins in these deep grooves.  Teeth with these conditions are hard to clean and are very susceptible to decay.  A sealant protects the tooth by sealing deep grooves, creating a smooth, easy to clean surface.

          Sealants can protect teeth from decay for many years, but need to be checked for wear and chipping at regular dental visits.

          Reasons for sealants:

          • Children and teenagers – As soon as the six-year molars (the first permanent back teeth) appear or any time throughout the cavity prone years of 6-16.
          • Adults – Tooth surfaces without decay that have deep grooves or depressions.
          • Baby teeth – Occasionally done if teeth have deep grooves or depressions and child is cavity prone.

          What do sealants involve?

          Sealants are easily applied by your dentist or dental hygienist and the process takes only a couple of minutes per tooth.

          The teeth to be sealed are thoroughly cleaned and then surrounded with cotton to keep the area dry.  A special solution is applied to the enamel surface to help the sealant bond to the teeth.  The teeth are then rinsed and dried.  Sealant material is carefully painted onto the enamel surface to cover the deep grooves or depressions.  Depending on the type of sealant used, the material will either harden automatically or with a special curing light.

          Proper home care, a balanced diet, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new sealants.

            FLOURIDE

            Fluorine, a natural element in the fluoride compound, has proven to be effective in minimizing childhood cavities and tooth decay.  Fluoride is a key ingredient in many popular brands of toothpaste, oral gel, and mouthwash, and can also be found in most community water supplies.  Though fluoride is an important part of any good oral care routine, overconsumption can result in a condition known as fluorosis.  The pediatric dentist is able to monitor fluoride levels, and check that children are receiving the appropriate amount.

            How can fluoride prevent tooth decay?

            Fluoride fulfills two important dental functions.  First, it helps staunch mineral loss from tooth enamel, and second, it promotes the remineralization of tooth enamel.

            When carbohydrates (sugars) are consumed, oral bacteria feed on them and produce harmful acids.  These acids attack tooth enamel – especially in children who take medications or produce less saliva.  Repeated acid attacks result in cavities, tooth decay, and childhood periodontal disease.  Fluoride protects tooth enamel from acid attacks and reduces the risk of childhood tooth decay.

            Fluoride is especially effective when used as part of a good oral hygiene regimen.  Reducing the consumption of sugary foods, brushing and flossing regularly, and visiting the pediatric dentist biannually, all supplement the work of fluoride and keep young teeth healthy.

            How much fluoride is enough?

            Since community water supplies and toothpastes usually contain fluoride, it is essential that children do not ingest too much.  For this reason, children under the age of two should use an ADA-approved, non-fluoridated brand of toothpaste.  Children between the ages of two and five years old should use a pea-sized amount of ADA-approved fluoridated toothpaste, on a clean toothbrush, twice each day.  They should be encouraged to spit out any extra fluid after brushing.  This part might take time, encouragement, and practice.

            The amount of fluoride children ingest between the ages of one and four years old determines whether or not fluorosis occurs later.  The most common symptom of fluorosis is white specks on the permanent teeth.  Children over the age of eight years old are not considered to be at-risk for fluorosis, but should still use an ADA-approved brand of toothpaste.

            Does my child need fluoride supplements?

            The pediatric dentist is the best person to decide whether a child needs fluoride supplements.  First, the dentist will ask questions in order to determine how much fluoride the child is currently receiving, gain a general health history, and evaluate the sugar content in the child’s diet.  If a child is not receiving enough fluoride and is determined to be at high-risk for tooth decay, an at-home fluoride supplement might be recommended.

            Topical fluoride can also be applied to the tooth enamel quickly and painlessly during a regular office visit.  There are many convenient forms of topical fluoride, including foam, liquids, varnishes, and gels.  Depending on the age of the child and their willingness to cooperate, topical fluoride can either be held on the teeth for several minutes in specialized trays or painted on with a brush.

            If you have questions or concerns about fluoride or fluorosis, please contact our office.

            ORTHODONTICS

            Orthodontic braces are commonly used to correct malocclusion (bad bite) and misalignment of the teeth. Braces are typically recommended for children and teenagers, but an increasing number of adults are now seeking orthodontic treatments. Dental braces owe their success to technology that supports predictable results. Braces are tailored to the wearer’s unique needs and create beautifully straight smiles.

            There are several common alignment problems that dental braces can fix:

            • Underbite – The lower jaw projects further than the upper jaw
            • Overbite – The upper jaw projects further than the lower jaw
            • Overcrowding –The teeth twist or are misaligned due to insufficient space in arches
            • Crossbite – Teeth on the upper arch bite down inside or outside of the corresponding teeth on the lower arch and vice versa

            Why Choose Braces?

            Crooked, twisted or poorly spaced teeth can be an aesthetic issue, but malocclusion and dental misalignment impact far more than appearance. In fact, malocclusion has been linked to other dental problems, as well as uncomfortable physical issues. Even a single improperly positioned tooth can cause difficulties in hygiene routines and make patients feel self-conscious.

            Braces offer many benefits, including:

            • Improved Oral Hygiene – Poorly aligned teeth can make maintaining excellent oral hygiene difficult. Hard-to-reach places between overlapped and tight teeth can become breeding grounds for oral bacteria.
            • Better Digestion – Serious digestive disorders can result from improper chewing created by significant bite misalignment. Realigning the teeth and jaw using braces restores optimal functionality.
            • Improved Confidence – Dental patients with properly aligned teeth enjoy a positive self-image and do not feel worried about displaying their smiles in social and professional situations.

            What Are Some Common Types Of Braces?

            There are two categories of dental braces: fixed appliances and removable appliances.

            Fixed braces – These braces are used when the malocclusion is severe or when treatment needs to be expedient. After the initial fitting of the braces by bonding brackets to teeth and threading archwires, routine adjustments are required to ensure that continuous pressure is being applied to the teeth.

            Removable braces – With modern orthodontic technology, removable trays can be utilized when malocclusion is less severe or in situations where fixed braces would be impractical. The most common types of removable braces include Invisalign® and other clear tray orthodontics. Removable dental braces are preferred by many patients, as they are versatile, convenient and discreet.

            If you have any questions or concerns about orthodontic braces, please contact your oral health professional.

            TOOTH EXTRACTIONS

            Tooth extractions, or the removal of one or more teeth, are usually used as a last resort in dentistry, as keeping the natural tooth in the mouth is ideal. There are many reasons why single or multiple extractions may be performed, including pervasive tooth decay, the impaction of wisdom teeth, or the need to create space for orthodontic devices.

            The most significant short-term benefit associated with tooth extraction is the elimination of pain. If a tooth is severely decayed or an infection is present, removing the affected tooth almost immediately alleviates discomfort. However, it should be noted that further procedures are necessary to replace the extracted tooth. Leaving a gap is not a viable option as the other teeth tend to twist out of alignment to fill the space.

            Why might I need to have a tooth extraction?

            Tooth extractions are incredibly common procedures. It should be reiterated that an extraction is used as a procedure of last resort, when nothing more can be done to save the tooth.

            Here is a brief overview of some of the main reasons for tooth extraction:

            Deep decay – This is easily the most common reason for tooth extraction, accounting for around two-thirds of all extraction procedures performed. When decay affects the surface of the tooth as well as the pulp, root canal procedures cannot be performed. Root canal therapy is only viable where the general structure of the tooth is in stable condition.

            Extra teeth –There are a variety of explanations associated with extra teeth, but most commonly they are baby teeth that do not shed. Extra teeth take up space on the arch, causing nearby teeth to twist out of place. A tooth extraction is necessary in this case to provide enough space for the teeth to properly realign.

            Periodontal disease – Often teeth have to be extracted because the gums and underlying bone are so severely eroded that they can no longer hold the tooth in place securely. The cause of bone and gum recession is almost always advanced periodontal disease (gum disease). Poor bone density means that the chance of restoring the natural tooth is minimal.

            Prior to braces – Traditional orthodontic braces require enough space to for the teeth to move into ideal alignment. If space cannot be created naturally, a tooth may be extracted as an alternative.

            Fractured teeth – Fortunately, dentists are able to save injured teeth in most circumstances with the aid of root canal therapy. However, there are some instances where the tooth has become fractured in a way that makes repair impossible. Your oral health professional will remove the tooth and use a prosthetic replacement in most cases.

            How is the extraction procedure performed?

            Generally, tooth extraction can be simple in nature or involve more complex surgical processes. Simple extractions are performed on fully emerged teeth after applying local anesthetic to the treatment site. Instruments are used to elevate the tooth and then sever the periodontal ligament. The tooth is then carefully removed with dental forceps.

            Surgical extractions are performed on teeth that are either invisible or inaccessible, like un-erupted wisdom teeth. An incision is usually made in the gum tissue and a drill is used to precisely remove some of the adjacent bone tissue. Sometimes, the tooth has to be split into several pieces to completely remove it.

            If you have any questions or concerns about tooth extraction, please contact your oral health care provider.

            RESTORATIONS & FILLINGS

            A dental restoration or dental filling is a treatment to restore the function, integrity, and morphology of missing tooth structure resulting from caries or external trauma as well as to the replacement of such structure supported by dental implants.

            They are of two broad types—direct and indirect—and are further classified by location and size. A root canal filling, for example, is a restorative technique used to fill the space where the dental pulp normally resides.

            ORAL & NITROUS SEDATION

            ORAL SEDATION

            Oral sedation dentistry is a medical procedure involving the administration of sedative drugs via an oral route, generally to facilitate a dental procedure and reduce patients anxiety related to the experience.

            Oral sedation is one of the available methods of conscious sedation dentistry, along with inhalation sedation (e.g., nitrous oxide) and conscious intravenous sedation. Treatment may include additional dosing on the night proceeding the procedure, to mitigate anxiety-related insomnia.

            The procedure is generally recognized as safe, with the effective dosages being below levels sufficient to impair breathing.

            NITROUS SEDATION

            Sedation (nitrous oxide) for dental procedures. Nitrous oxide is a gas, and is commonly known as happy gas or laughing gas. Giving nitrous oxide is a way to help reduce a child’s pain and anxiety during dental treatment. The gas is given through a small nosepiece, and your child will be awake throughout the procedure.

            EMERGENCY DENTISTRY

            SAME DAY EXAM

            Dental Exam

            A comprehensive dental exam will be performed by your dentist on this dental visit and appropriate treatment will be performed.

            COMPOSITE FILLINGS

            A composite (tooth colored) filling is used to repair a tooth that is affected by decay, cracks, fractures, etc.  The decayed or affected portion of the tooth will be removed and then filled with a composite filling.

            There are many types of filling materials available, each with their own advantages and disadvantages.  You and your dentist can discuss the best options for restoring your teeth.  Composite fillings, along with silver amalgam fillings, are the most widely used today.  Because composite fillings are tooth colored, they can be closely matched to the color of existing teeth, and are more aesthetically suited for use in front teeth or more visible areas of the mouth.

            As with most dental restorations, composite fillings are not permanent and may someday have to be replaced.  They are very durable and will last many years, giving you a long lasting, beautiful smile.

            Reasons for composite fillings:

            • Chipped teeth.
            • Closing space between two teeth.
            • Cracked or broken teeth.
            • Decayed teeth.
            • Worn teeth.

            How are composite fillings placed?

            Composite fillings are usually placed in one appointment.  While the tooth is numb, your dentist will remove decay as needed.  The space will then be thoroughly cleaned and carefully prepared before the new filling is placed.  If the decay was near the nerve of the tooth, a special medication will be applied for added protection.  The composite filling will then be precisely placed, shaped, and polished, restoring your tooth to its original shape and function.

            It is normal to experience sensitivity to hot and cold when composite fillings are first placed, however this will subside shortly after your tooth acclimates to the new filling.

            You will be given care instructions at the conclusion of your treatment.  Good oral hygiene practices, eating habits, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new fillings.

            ROOT CANAL

            Root canal therapy is needed when the nerve of a tooth is affected by decay or infection.  In order to save the tooth, the pulp (the living tissue inside the tooth), nerves, bacteria, and any decay are removed and the resulting space is filled with special, medicated, dental materials, which restore the tooth to its full function.

            Having a root canal done on a tooth is the treatment of choice to save a tooth that otherwise would die and have to be removed.  Many patients believe that removing a tooth that has problems is the solution, but what is not realized is that extracting (pulling) a tooth will ultimately be more costly and cause significant problems for adjacent teeth.

            Root canal treatment is highly successful and usually lasts a lifetime, although on occasion, a tooth will have to be retreated due to new infections.

            Signs and symptoms for possible root canal therapy:

            • An abscess (or pimple) on the gums.
            • Sensitivity to hot and cold.
            • Severe toothache pain.
            • Sometimes no symptoms are present.
            • Swelling and/or tenderness.

            Reasons for root canal therapy:

            • Decay has reached the tooth pulp (the living tissue inside the tooth).
            • Infection or abscess have developed inside the tooth or at the root tip.
            • Injury or trauma to the tooth.

            What does root canal therapy involve?

            A root canal procedure requires one or more appointments and can be performed by a dentist or endodontist (a root canal specialist).

            While the tooth is numb, a rubber dam (a sheet of rubber) will be placed around the tooth to keep it dry and free of saliva.  An access opening is made on top of the tooth and a series of root canal files are placed into the opening, one at a time, removing the pulp, nerve tissue, and bacteria.  If tooth decay is present, it will also be removed with special dental instruments.

            Once the tooth is thoroughly cleaned, it will be sealed with either a permanent filling or, if additional appointments are needed, a temporary filling will be placed.

            At the next appointment, usually a week later, the roots and the inside cavity of the tooth will be filled and sealed with special dental materials.  A filling will be placed to cover the opening on top of the tooth.  In addition, all teeth that have root canal treatment should have a crown (cap) placed.  This will protect the tooth and prevent it from breaking, and restore it to its full function.

            After treatment, your tooth may still be sensitive, but this will subside as the inflammation diminishes and the tooth has healed.

            You will be given care instructions after each appointment.  Good oral hygiene practices and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your root canal treatment.

            EXTRACTIONS

            Tooth extractions, or the removal of one or more teeth, are usually used as a last resort in dentistry, as keeping the natural tooth in the mouth is ideal. There are many reasons why single or multiple extractions may be performed, including pervasive tooth decay, the impaction of wisdom teeth, or the need to create space for orthodontic devices.

            The most significant short-term benefit associated with tooth extraction is the elimination of pain. If a tooth is severely decayed or an infection is present, removing the affected tooth almost immediately alleviates discomfort. However, it should be noted that further procedures are necessary to replace the extracted tooth. Leaving a gap is not a viable option as the other teeth tend to twist out of alignment to fill the space.

            Why might I need to have a tooth extraction?

            Tooth extractions are incredibly common procedures. It should be reiterated that an extraction is used as a procedure of last resort, when nothing more can be done to save the tooth.

            Here is a brief overview of some of the main reasons for tooth extraction:

            Deep decay – This is easily the most common reason for tooth extraction, accounting for around two-thirds of all extraction procedures performed. When decay affects the surface of the tooth as well as the pulp, root canal procedures cannot be performed. Root canal therapy is only viable where the general structure of the tooth is in stable condition.

            Extra teeth –There are a variety of explanations associated with extra teeth, but most commonly they are baby teeth that do not shed. Extra teeth take up space on the arch, causing nearby teeth to twist out of place. A tooth extraction is necessary in this case to provide enough space for the teeth to properly realign.

            Periodontal disease – Often teeth have to be extracted because the gums and underlying bone are so severely eroded that they can no longer hold the tooth in place securely. The cause of bone and gum recession is almost always advanced periodontal disease (gum disease). Poor bone density means that the chance of restoring the natural tooth is minimal.

            Prior to braces – Traditional orthodontic braces require enough space to for the teeth to move into ideal alignment. If space cannot be created naturally, a tooth may be extracted as an alternative.

            Fractured teeth – Fortunately, dentists are able to save injured teeth in most circumstances with the aid of root canal therapy. However, there are some instances where the tooth has become fractured in a way that makes repair impossible. Your oral health professional will remove the tooth and use a prosthetic replacement in most cases.

            How is the extraction procedure performed?

            Generally, tooth extraction can be simple in nature or involve more complex surgical processes. Simple extractions are performed on fully emerged teeth after applying local anesthetic to the treatment site. Instruments are used to elevate the tooth and then sever the periodontal ligament. The tooth is then carefully removed with dental forceps.

            Surgical extractions are performed on teeth that are either invisible or inaccessible, like un-erupted wisdom teeth. An incision is usually made in the gum tissue and a drill is used to precisely remove some of the adjacent bone tissue. Sometimes, the tooth has to be split into several pieces to completely remove it.

            If you have any questions or concerns about tooth extraction, please contact your oral health care provider.

            COSMETIC DENTISTRY

            WHITENING

            A bright, healthy smile boosts confidence and is aesthetically pleasing to others. While there are many bleaching treatments on the market, it can be difficult to know which one to choose. The Whitening System is available as an in-office treatment and take-home treatment. It has proven to whiten teeth by up to 7 shades in 30 minutes.

            The creators of the Professional Whitening System have engineered a unique mix of active ingredients to ensure that sensitivity is minimized while teeth whitening effects are maximized. In addition to whitening components, the gel also contains minerals and fluoride, allowing teeth to remain healthy and strong.

            The in-office and take-home Professional treatments both remove stains easily. Examples of reversible stains include:

            • Yellowing caused by aging
            • Tobacco stains
            • Stains caused by pigmented foods and drinks (like red wine)

            The professional chairside treatment

            Before the teeth can be bleached, surface plaque, debris and calculus need to be removed by way of prophylaxis (teeth cleaning). If signs of gum inflammation and decay are present, these will need to be managed by the dentist before the whitening gel is applied. Usually the dentist will photograph the teeth prior to applying the bleaching gel, so before-and-after comparisons can be made.

            The Professional Chairside treatment contains 25% hydrogen peroxide. The whitening gel is applied to the teeth for either 30 minutes or 60 minutes, depending on severity of staining. Though results vary for each patient, whitening gel lightens teeth by approximately 7 shades in 30 minutes and 12 shades in 60 minutes. Whitening is chemically activated, so no heat, lasers or lamps are required.

            Professional take-home kits

            Professional take-home kits work as effectively as in-office treatment. The advantage of the do-it-yourself option is cost-effectiveness and personal control over treatment. The take-home gel contains either 22% or 32% carbamide peroxide, compared to the hydrogen peroxide used in chair-side whitening. For optimal results, the whitening gel should be used for 3 minutes for 10-14 days. Everything needed to whiten the teeth is included in the take-home kit, including gel, syringes, customized trays and toothpaste.

            Here is a step-by-step guide for using Professional take-home kits:

            • Brush and floss the teeth carefully
            • Apply a moderate line of gel into the whitening trays
            • Every tooth indentation in the tray should contain roughly the same amount of gel
            • Take care not to overfill the trays
            • Insert the whitening trays over the teeth
            • Carefully wipe away any excess gel
            • Wait for 3 minutes then remove the mouthpiece
            • Rinse the mouth with water and mouthwash
            • Clean the trays thoroughly
            • Contact your dental office for refills

            If you have any questions or concerns about whitening, please contact your dentist.

            DENTAL IMPLANTS

            Dental implants are a great way to replace missing teeth and also provide a fixed solution to having removable partial or complete dentures.  Implants provide excellent support and stability for these dental appliances.

            Dental implants are artificial roots and teeth (usually titanium) that are surgically placed into the upper or lower jaw bone by a dentist or Periodontist – a specialist of the gums and supporting bone.  The teeth attached to implants are very natural looking and often enhance or restore a patient’s smile!

            Dental implants are strong and durable and will last many years.  On occasion, they will have to be re-tightened or replaced due to normal wear.

            Reasons for dental implants:

            • Replace one or more missing teeth without affecting adjacent teeth.
            • Resolve joint pain or bite problems caused by teeth shifting into missing tooth space.
            • Restore a patient’s confident smile.
            • Restore chewing, speech, and digestion.
            • Restore or enhance facial tissues.
            • Support a bridge or denture, making it more secure and comfortable.

            What does getting dental implants involve?

            The process of getting implants requires a number of visits over several months.

            X-rays and impressions (molds) are taken of the jaw and teeth to determine bone, gum tissue, and spacing available for an implant.  While the area is numb, the implant will be surgically placed into the bone and allowed to heal and integrate itself for up to six months.   Depending on the type of implant, a second surgery may be required in order to place the “post” that will hold the artificial tooth in place.  With other implants the post and anchor are already attached and placed at the same time.

            After several weeks of healing the artificial teeth are made and fitted to the post portion of the anchor.  Because several fittings may be required, this step may take one to two months to complete.  After a healing period, the artificial teeth are securely attached to the implant, providing excellent stability and comfort to the patient.

            You will receive care instructions when your treatment is completed.  Good oral hygiene and eating habits, alongside regular dental visits, will aid in the life of your new implant.

            If you have questions about dental implants or would like to schedule a consultation, please contact our office.

            PORCELAIN CROWN (CAP)

            A crown (or cap) is a covering that encases the entire tooth surface restoring it to its original shape and size.  A crown protects and strengthens tooth structure that cannot be restored with fillings or other types of restorations.

            Although there are several types of crowns, porcelain (tooth colored crown) are the most popular, because they resemble your natural teeth.  They are highly durable and will last many years, but like most dental restorations, they may eventually need to be replaced.  Porcelain crowns are made to match the shape, size, and color or your teeth giving you a natural, long-lasting beautiful smile.

            Reasons for crowns:

            • Broken or fractured teeth.
            • Cosmetic enhancement.
            • Decayed teeth.
            • Fractured fillings.
            • Large fillings.
            • Tooth has a root canal.

            What does getting a crown involve?

            A crown procedure usually requires two appointments.  Your first appointment will include taking several highly accurate molds (or impressions) that will be used to create your custom crown.  A mold will also be used to create a temporary crown which will stay on your tooth for approximately two weeks until your new crown is fabricated by a dental laboratory.

            While the tooth is numb, the dentist will prepare the tooth by removing any decay and shaping the surface to properly fit the crown.  Once these details are accomplished, your temporary crown will be placed with temporary cement and your bite will be checked to ensure you are biting properly.

            At your second appointment your temporary crown will be removed, the tooth will be cleaned, and your new crown will be carefully placed to ensure the spacing and bite are accurate.

            You will be given care instructions and encouraged to have regular dental visits to check your new crown.

            ORTHODONTICS

            Orthodontic braces are commonly used to correct malocclusion (bad bite) and misalignment of the teeth. Braces are typically recommended for children and teenagers, but an increasing number of adults are now seeking orthodontic treatments. Dental braces owe their success to technology that supports predictable results. Braces are tailored to the wearer’s unique needs and create beautifully straight smiles.

            There are several common alignment problems that dental braces can fix:

            • Underbite – The lower jaw projects further than the upper jaw
            • Overbite – The upper jaw projects further than the lower jaw
            • Overcrowding –The teeth twist or are misaligned due to insufficient space in arches
            • Crossbite – Teeth on the upper arch bite down inside or outside of the corresponding teeth on the lower arch and vice versa

            Why Choose Braces?

            Crooked, twisted or poorly spaced teeth can be an aesthetic issue, but malocclusion and dental misalignment impact far more than appearance. In fact, malocclusion has been linked to other dental problems, as well as uncomfortable physical issues. Even a single improperly positioned tooth can cause difficulties in hygiene routines and make patients feel self-conscious.

            Braces offer many benefits, including:

            • Improved Oral Hygiene – Poorly aligned teeth can make maintaining excellent oral hygiene difficult. Hard-to-reach places between overlapped and tight teeth can become breeding grounds for oral bacteria.
            • Better Digestion – Serious digestive disorders can result from improper chewing created by significant bite misalignment. Realigning the teeth and jaw using braces restores optimal functionality.
            • Improved Confidence – Dental patients with properly aligned teeth enjoy a positive self-image and do not feel worried about displaying their smiles in social and professional situations.

            What Are Some Common Types Of Braces?

            There are two categories of dental braces: fixed appliances and removable appliances.

            Fixed braces – These braces are used when the malocclusion is severe or when treatment needs to be expedient. After the initial fitting of the braces by bonding brackets to teeth and threading archwires, routine adjustments are required to ensure that continuous pressure is being applied to the teeth.

            Removable braces – With modern orthodontic technology, removable trays can be utilized when malocclusion is less severe or in situations where fixed braces would be impractical. The most common types of removable braces include Invisalign® and other clear tray orthodontics. Removable dental braces are preferred by many patients, as they are versatile, convenient and discreet.

            If you have any questions or concerns about orthodontic braces, please contact your oral health professional.

            SEDATION DENTISTRY

            ORAL SEDATION

            Oral sedation dentistry is a medical procedure involving the administration of sedative drugs via an oral route, generally to facilitate a dental procedure and reduce patients anxiety related to the experience.

            Oral sedation is one of the available methods of conscious sedation dentistry, along with inhalation sedation (e.g., nitrous oxide) and conscious intravenous sedation. Treatment may include additional dosing on the night proceeding the procedure, to mitigate anxiety-related insomnia.

            The procedure is generally recognized as safe, with the effective dosages being below levels sufficient to impair breathing.

            NITROUS SEDATION

            Sedation (nitrous oxide) for dental procedures. Nitrous oxide is a gas, and is commonly known as happy gas or laughing gas. Giving nitrous oxide is a way to help reduce a child’s pain and anxiety during dental treatment. The gas is given through a small nosepiece, and your child will be awake throughout the procedure.

            IV SEDATION

            Intravenous (IV) sedation dentistry is used primarily for moderate to severe dental surgical procedures (ie wisdom teeth extraction) and for patients that want to be completely asleep during their dental treatment. The sedation drugs are administered intravenously to the patient. IV sedation dentistry allows you to experience a deeper level of sedation so you do not remember any parts of the procedure.

            Who Is a Candidate For Sedation Dentistry?

            People who have…

            • high fear
            • traumatic dental experiences
            • difficulty getting numb
            • a bad gag reflex
            • very sensitive teeth
            • complex dental problems
            • limited time to complete dental care

            WISDOM TEETH EXTRACTION

            WISDOM TEETH EXTRACTIONS

            Third molars, commonly referred to as wisdom teeth, are usually the last four of 32 teeth to erupt (surface) in the mouth, generally making their appearance between the ages of 17 to 25. They are located at the back of the mouth (top and bottom), near the entrance to the throat. The term “wisdom” stems from the idea that the molars surface at a time typically associated with increased maturity or “wisdom”.

            In most cases, inadequate space in the mouth does not allow the wisdom teeth to erupt properly and become fully functional. When this happens, the tooth can become impacted (stuck) in an undesirable or potentially harmful position. If left untreated, impacted wisdom teeth can contribute to infection, damage to other teeth, and possibly cysts or tumors.

            There are several types, or degrees, of impaction based on the actual depth of the teeth within the jaw:

            Soft Tissue Impaction: The upper portion of the tooth (the crown) has penetrated through the bone, but the gingiva (gum) is covering part or all of the tooth’s crown and has not positioned properly around the tooth. Because it is difficult to keep the area clean, food can become trapped below the gum and cause an infection and/or tooth decay, resulting in pain and swelling.

            Partial Bony Impaction: The tooth has partially erupted, but a portion of the crown remains submerged below the gum and surrounding jawbone. Again, because it is difficult to keep the area clean, infection will commonly occur.

            Complete Bony Impaction: The tooth is completely encased by jawbone. This will require more complex removal techniques.

            Reasons to remove wisdom teeth

            While not all wisdom teeth require removal, wisdom teeth extractions are most often performed because of an active problem such as pain, swelling, decay or infection, or as a preventative measure to avoid serious problems in the future. If impaction of one or more wisdom teeth is present, and left untreated, a number of potentially harmful outcomes can occur, including:

            • Damage to nearby teeth: Second molars (the teeth directly in front of the wisdom teeth) can be adversely affected by impacted wisdom teeth, resulting in tooth decay (cavities), periodontal disease (gum disease) and possible bone loss.
            • Disease: Although uncommon, cysts and tumors can occur in the areas surrounding impacted wisdom teeth.
            • Infection: Bacteria and food can become trapped under the gum tissue, resulting in an infection. The infection can cause considerable pain and danger.
            • Tooth Crowding: It has been theorized that impacted wisdom teeth can put pressure on other teeth and cause them to become misaligned (crowded or twisted). This theory isn’t universally accepted by all dental professionals, and it has never been validated by any scientific studies.

            Wisdom teeth examination

            As with any dental procedure, your dentist will want to initially conduct a thorough examination of the wisdom and surrounding teeth. Panoramic or digital X-rays will be taken in order for your dentist to evaluate the position of the wisdom teeth and determine if a current problem exists, or the likelihood of any potential future problems.  The X-rays can also expose additional risk factors, such as deterioration or decay of nearby teeth. Early evaluation and treatment (typically in the mid-teen years) is recommended in order to identify potential problems and to improve the results for patients requiring wisdom teeth extractions. Only after a thorough examination can your dentist provide you with the best options for your particular case.

            What does the removal of wisdom teeth involve?

            Wisdom teeth removal is a common procedure, generally performed under local anesthesia, intravenous (IV) sedation, or general anesthesia by a specially trained dentist in an office surgery suite. The surgery does not require an overnight stay, and you will be released with post-operative instructions and medication (if necessary), to help manage any swelling or discomfort.

              DENTAL IMPLANTS

              IMPLANTS

              Dental implants are a great way to replace missing teeth and also provide a fixed solution to having removable partial or complete dentures. Implants provide excellent support and stability for these dental appliances.

              Dental implants are artificial roots and teeth (usually titanium) that are surgically placed into the upper or lower jaw bone by a dentist or Periodontist – a specialist of the gums and supporting bone.  The teeth attached to implants are very natural looking and often enhance or restore a patient’s smile!

              Dental implants are strong and durable and will last many years.  On occasion, they will have to be re-tightened or replaced due to normal wear.

              Reasons for dental implants:

              • Replace one or more missing teeth without affecting adjacent teeth.
              • Resolve joint pain or bite problems caused by teeth shifting into missing tooth space.
              • Restore a patient’s confident smile.
              • Restore chewing, speech, and digestion.
              • Restore or enhance facial tissues.
              • Support a bridge or denture, making it more secure and comfortable.

              What does getting dental implants involve?

              The process of getting implants requires a number of visits over several months.

              X-rays and impressions (molds) are taken of the jaw and teeth to determine bone, gum tissue, and spacing available for an implant.  While the area is numb, the implant will be surgically placed into the bone and allowed to heal and integrate itself for up to six months.   Depending on the type of implant, a second surgery may be required in order to place the “post” that will hold the artificial tooth in place.  With other implants the post and anchor are already attached and placed at the same time.

              After several weeks of healing the artificial teeth are made and fitted to the post portion of the anchor.  Because several fittings may be required, this step may take one to two months to complete.  After a healing period, the artificial teeth are securely attached to the implant, providing excellent stability and comfort to the patient.

              You will receive care instructions when your treatment is completed.  Good oral hygiene and eating habits, alongside regular dental visits, will aid in the life of your new implant.

              If you have questions about dental implants or would like to schedule a consultation, please contact our office.

              TOOTH EXTRACTIONS

              Tooth extractions, or the removal of one or more teeth, are usually used as a last resort in dentistry, as keeping the natural tooth in the mouth is ideal. There are many reasons why single or multiple extractions may be performed, including pervasive tooth decay, the impaction of wisdom teeth, or the need to create space for orthodontic devices.

              The most significant short-term benefit associated with tooth extraction is the elimination of pain. If a tooth is severely decayed or an infection is present, removing the affected tooth almost immediately alleviates discomfort. However, it should be noted that further procedures are necessary to replace the extracted tooth. Leaving a gap is not a viable option as the other teeth tend to twist out of alignment to fill the space.

              Why might I need to have a tooth extraction?

              Tooth extractions are incredibly common procedures. It should be reiterated that an extraction is used as a procedure of last resort, when nothing more can be done to save the tooth.

              Here is a brief overview of some of the main reasons for tooth extraction:

              Deep decay – This is easily the most common reason for tooth extraction, accounting for around two-thirds of all extraction procedures performed. When decay affects the surface of the tooth as well as the pulp, root canal procedures cannot be performed. Root canal therapy is only viable where the general structure of the tooth is in stable condition.

              Extra teeth –There are a variety of explanations associated with extra teeth, but most commonly they are baby teeth that do not shed. Extra teeth take up space on the arch, causing nearby teeth to twist out of place. A tooth extraction is necessary in this case to provide enough space for the teeth to properly realign.

              Periodontal disease – Often teeth have to be extracted because the gums and underlying bone are so severely eroded that they can no longer hold the tooth in place securely. The cause of bone and gum recession is almost always advanced periodontal disease (gum disease). Poor bone density means that the chance of restoring the natural tooth is minimal.

              Prior to braces – Traditional orthodontic braces require enough space to for the teeth to move into ideal alignment. If space cannot be created naturally, a tooth may be extracted as an alternative.

              Fractured teeth – Fortunately, dentists are able to save injured teeth in most circumstances with the aid of root canal therapy. However, there are some instances where the tooth has become fractured in a way that makes repair impossible. Your oral health professional will remove the tooth and use a prosthetic replacement in most cases.

              How is the extraction procedure performed?

              Generally, tooth extraction can be simple in nature or involve more complex surgical processes. Simple extractions are performed on fully emerged teeth after applying local anesthetic to the treatment site. Instruments are used to elevate the tooth and then sever the periodontal ligament. The tooth is then carefully removed with dental forceps.

              Surgical extractions are performed on teeth that are either invisible or inaccessible, like un-erupted wisdom teeth. An incision is usually made in the gum tissue and a drill is used to precisely remove some of the adjacent bone tissue. Sometimes, the tooth has to be split into several pieces to completely remove it.

              If you have any questions or concerns about tooth extraction, please contact your oral health care provider.

              DENTURES

              COMPLETE DENTURES

              A denture is a removable dental appliance and a replacement for missing teeth and surrounding tissue. They are made to closely resemble your natural teeth and may even enhance your smile.

              There are two types of dentures – complete and partial dentures.  Complete dentures are used when all of the teeth are missing, while partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain. A partial denture not only fills in the spaces created by missing teeth, it prevents other teeth from shifting.

              A complete denture can be either “conventional” or “immediate.”  A conventional type is made after the teeth have been removed and the gum tissue has healed (usually takes 4 to 6 weeks). During this time, the patient will go without teeth. Immediate dentures are made in advance and immediately placed after the teeth are removed, thus preventing the patient from having to be without teeth during the healing process. Once the tissues shrink and heal, adjustments will have to be made.

              Dentures are very durable appliances and will last many years but may have to be remade, repaired, or readjusted due to normal wear.

              Reasons for dentures:

              • Complete Denture – Loss of all teeth in an arch.
              • Partial Denture – Loss of several teeth in an arch.
              • Enhancing smile and facial tissues.
              • Improving chewing, speech, and digestion.

              What does getting dentures involve?

              The process of getting dentures requires several appointments, usually over a period of several weeks. Highly accurate impressions (molds) and measurements are taken and used to create your custom denture. Several “try-in” appointments may be necessary to ensure proper shape, color, and fit. At the final appointment, your dentist will precisely adjust and place the completed denture, ensuring a natural and comfortable fit.

              It is normal to experience increased saliva flow, some soreness, and possible speech and chewing difficulty, however this will subside as your muscles and tissues get used to the new dentures.

              You will be given care instructions for your new dentures. Proper cleaning of your new dental appliance, good oral hygiene, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new dentures.

              PARTIAL DENTURES

              A denture is a removable dental appliance and a replacement for missing teeth and surrounding tissue. They are made to closely resemble your natural teeth and may even enhance your smile.

              There are two types of dentures – complete and partial dentures.  Complete dentures are used when all of the teeth are missing, while partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain. A partial denture not only fills in the spaces created by missing teeth, it prevents other teeth from shifting.

              A complete denture can be either “conventional” or “immediate.”  A conventional type is made after the teeth have been removed and the gum tissue has healed (usually takes 4 to 6 weeks). During this time, the patient will go without teeth. Immediate dentures are made in advance and immediately placed after the teeth are removed, thus preventing the patient from having to be without teeth during the healing process. Once the tissues shrink and heal, adjustments will have to be made.

              Dentures are very durable appliances and will last many years but may have to be remade, repaired, or readjusted due to normal wear.

              Reasons for dentures:

              • Complete Denture – Loss of all teeth in an arch.
              • Partial Denture – Loss of several teeth in an arch.
              • Enhancing smile and facial tissues.
              • Improving chewing, speech, and digestion.

              What does getting dentures involve?

              The process of getting dentures requires several appointments, usually over a period of several weeks. Highly accurate impressions (molds) and measurements are taken and used to create your custom denture. Several “try-in” appointments may be necessary to ensure proper shape, color, and fit. At the final appointment, your dentist will precisely adjust and place the completed denture, ensuring a natural and comfortable fit.

              It is normal to experience increased saliva flow, some soreness, and possible speech and chewing difficulty, however this will subside as your muscles and tissues get used to the new dentures.

              You will be given care instructions for your new dentures. Proper cleaning of your new dental appliance, good oral hygiene, and regular dental visits will aid in the life of your new dentures.

              IMPLANT SUPPORTED DENTURES

              An implant-supported prosthesis is a denture, which is both retained and supported by four or more dental implants. This means that the denture does not rest on the gums. Rather, it is fixed on implants, which are embedded in bone. Only your dentist will remove the denture for cleaning and examination.

              Contact Pine Street Dental

              Patient

              Patient

              Appointment Time of Day

              Preferred Day of the Week

              10 + 11 =

              Telephone

              905-227-0303

              Addresss

              9 Pine St N #33, Thorold, ON L2V 4J6

              MON: 8:30AM – 7PM | TUE: 8:30AM – 5:30PM | WED: 9AM – 7PM | THU: 8:30AM – 5:30PM | FRI: 9AM – 12PM
              SAT: BY APPOINTMENT | SUN: CLOSED

              FLEXIBLE EVENING AND SATURDAY APPOINTMENTS